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Know what the court means by best interests of the child

On Behalf of | Apr 28, 2017 | child custody |

In all child custody cases, there is only one focus — the best interests of the child. This is easy for some people to understand; however, some people really struggle with understanding this concept.

If you are in the midst of a child custody battle, you need to keep your child’s interests at the heart of every decision or petition you make. It might help you to do this if you think about what the court considers for the best interests of the child.

There are several factors that determine the child’s best interests. Some of these will apply to some cases and not others. It is important that you think about your case as you consider these.

One thing that the court will consider is what your child wants. Of course, this is only applicable if your child is able to make his or her wishes known. If the child is too young or can’t convey these wishes, the court wouldn’t be able to consider this.

The court will also consider the child’s need for a stable home. This means that the court might consider who has served as the primary caregiver for the child. This is the person who has done basic tasks with the child like taking the child to school, helping with homework and making food.

Another thing that is considered is the relationship the child has with each parent. This is because the court wants to ensure that the child is comfortable and cared for at home. Of course, if there are any domestic violence issues, this is also considered.

Ultimately, what is best for your child is what needs to be done. You can’t focus on your needs or the desire to punish your ex. Keeping this in mind can help you throughout the custody case.

Source: FindLaw, “Focusing on the “Best Interests” of the Child,” accessed April 28, 2017